The Grand Guesthouse Key West Attractions

Audubon House & Tropical Gardens

205 Whitehead St.; (305) 294-2116                                         

Original lithographs of John James Audubon’s drawings are on display at this former home of shipwreck salvager Capt. John Geiger. Tour the home and the surrounding lush tropical gardens and learn the techniques Audubon used to create his avian masterpieces.


Conch Tour Train

303 Front St.;(305) 294-5161 or (888) 916-8687                      

The Conch Train has been winding its way through the streets of Key West since 1958. This hour-and-a-half tour has stops for refreshments and shopping. Sights include the Hemingway House, Southernmost Point and Bahama Village, among others.


Custom House Museum

281 Front St.; (305) 295-6616                                               

The Custom House was originally home to Key West’s customs office, postal service and district courts. It was restored and converted in the early 1990s into a museum and the official headquarters of the Key West Art & Historical Society.


Dry Tortugas National Park

(305) 242- 7700                                                                     

The Dry Tortugas is a cluster of seven islands about 70 miles west of Key West. The park is accessible only by boat (either your own with a permit, or on the Yankee Freedom III: 800-634-0939; or seaplane (305- 293-9300 or www.keywestseaplanecharters. com). Activities include exploring the historic Fort Jefferson, snorkeling, bird- watching, fishing and camping.


The Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum

907 Whitehead St.; (305) 294-1136                                      

This Spanish Colonial home where Ernest Hemingway once lived and wrote contains many of the original fixtures and furnishings, as well as artifacts from his life. Take the tour and say hello to one of the 40 to 50 six-toed cats, all descendants of Hemingway’s cat, Snowball.


Florida Keys Historical Military Memorial

1 Mallory Square

This open-air multi-war memorial to multiple wars is in honor of those who lost their lives while serving the U.S. Plaques explain battle information and list the names of Florida Keys military veterans dating back to World War II.


Florida Keys Eco-Discovery Center

35 E. Quay Road; (305) 809-4750                                          

Sponsored and operated in part by the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and NOAA, the Eco- Discovery Center features interactive exhibits, including a mock-up of Aquarius, the world’s only underwater ocean laboratory.


Fort East Martello Museum

3501 S. Roosevelt Blvd.; (305) 296-3913                               

This Civil War fort built in the late 1800s now houses a sculpture garden and museum featuring a collection of relics from the Civil War. Artifacts also document the wrecking and cigar- making industries—and the museum is home to Robert the Doll, a highlight on Key West’s trolley tours.


The Original Ghost Tours of Key West

430 Greene St.; (305) 294-9255                                            

Take a guided walking tour during the day or night through the eerie areas of Old Town Key West. The tours end inside the only haunted Hark Rock Café in the world, right on Duval Street.


Harry S. Truman Little White House

111 Front St.; (305) 294-9911                                               

This historic building famously served as the winter White House for President Harry S. Truman in 1946. Truman later made 10 more trips to the Little White House, which is now a museum focusing on his Key West experience during his presidency.


Key West AIDS Memorial

Foot of White Street and Atlantic Boulevard; At the entrance to the White Street Pier, the Key West AIDS Memorial commemorates Florida Keys- friendly people who have died from AIDS-related causes. New names are engraved each year on Dec. 1, World AIDS Day.


Key West Aquarium

1 Whitehead St., at Mallory Square; (888) 544-5927           

The Key West Aquarium is home to alligators, jellyfish, sharks and many other marine animals. It features a touch tank with conchs, sea stars, sea urchins, giant hermit crabs and horseshoe crabs. Guided tours and feeding presentations are available.


The Key West Butterfly & Nature Conservatory

1316 Duval St.; (305) 296-2988                                             

More than 50 different butterfly species from around the world and 20 different exotic bird species coexist in this climate-controlled, glass-enclosed habitat that includes waterfalls, flowering plants and trees.


Key West City Cemetery

701 Passover Lane; (305) 292-8177                                      
Stop at the sexton’s office near the entrance at Passover and Windsor lanes for a map of a free walking tour from the Historic Florida Keys Foundation. The tour includes the famous headstone of hypochondriac B.P. “Pearl” Roberts that reads: “I told you I was sick.” You can also arrange for a guided tour in exchange for a donation to the foundation by calling ahead of time.


Key West Food Tours

(305) 396-2224                                                                      

Walk with us, talk with us—and sample the best Key West cuisine along the way. Key West Food Tours take up to 10 people on a walking tour of Old Town, stopping at six island food favorites. Feast on authentic Cuban food at El Siboney, throw back a couple shots at the Key West Distillery (just in case you haven’t shaken off the mainland yet) and maybe try Blue Heaven’s famous Key lime pie, with its mile-high meringue. Then enjoy Camille’s, a funky, laid-back local favorite with great café con leche, by the way, and finish up at Andy’s Cabana, which serves yummy fish tacos, conch fritters and yellow snapper. But that’s not all! Smith will stuff you full of local history, as well. Learn how our 2-by-4 mile rock amalgamated Native Americans, Cubans, Bahamians, Greeks, explorers, adventurers, pirates, wreckers, scavengers, fisherman, hippies, writers and artists—and tourists just like you. Key West Food Tours, meets at 11 a.m. at Catherine and William streets. You’ll have to buy tickets to learn the exact location


Key West Historic Memorial Sculpture Garden

401 Wall St., at Mallory Square                                 

This sculpture garden, at the site of the original shoreline in Mallory Square, features 36 bronze busts of the most influential men and women from Key West’s past, including Henry Flagler, Ernest Hemingway and President Harry S. Truman, among others.


Key West Lighthouse & Keeper’s Quarters Museum

938 Whitehead St.; (305) 294-0012                                      

This lighthouse opened in 1848, was decommissioned by the Coast Guard in 1969, and now stands as a museum dedicated to Key West’s maritime heritage. Take a look at the artifacts of lighthouse keepers past, and then climb the 88 steps to the top of the lighthouse for a great view.


Key West Shipwreck Treasure Museum

1 Whitehead St.; (305) 292-8990                                          
Walk up the 65-foot lookout tower for a 365-degree view of Key West and its harbor, learn about the lucrative wrecking industry and discover artifacts from the Isaac Allerton, the richest shipwreck in Key West’s history.


Key West Theater

512 Eaton St.; (305) 985-0433                                               

The Key West Theater is a newly renovated performing arts center that presents original plays, musicals, films and concerts. The season includes world premieres of plays penned by Key West writers, a Broadway concert series, nationally known musicians and music acts, concerts by local musicians as well as national recording artists such as Christopher Cross.


Key West Tropical Forest & Botanical Garden

5210 College Road, Stock Island; (305) 296-1504                 

This natural conservation habitat is home to many endangered flora and fauna as well as two of the last remaining freshwater ponds in the Keys, making it a migratory stopping point for rare birds from as far away as South America.


Key West Wildlife Center

1801 White St.; (305) 292-1008                                            

The Key West Wildlife Center is in the 8-acre Sonny McCoy Indigenous Park and includes a nature walk with a freshwater pond and two aviaries. The center also provides rehabilitative care to more than 1,000 native wild animals.


Mallory Square Sunset Celebration

400 Wall St.; (786) 565-7448;                                                

This nightly festival begins at the water’s edge about an hour or two before sunset and includes street performers, local artisans, food carts, palmists and psychics. Jewelry, T-shirts, photographs, paintings and sculptures made by local artists are also for sale.


Mel Fisher Maritime Museum

200 Greene St.; (305) 294-2633                                            

Exhibits include treasures from the Spanish galleons of 1622 discovered by Mel Fisher and his crew, Spanish coins in the New World, the Real Pirates of the Caribbean, the Science of Shipwrecks, artifacts from a merchant slave ship and much more.


Mile Marker 0 Sign

490 Whitehead St., corner of Fleming Street

U.S. 1 begins here in Key West, continues 2,369 miles north up the East Coast, and ends in Fort Kent, Maine. Stop here to commemorate your visit to Key West with a photo next to the iconic Mile Marker 0 sign.


Old Town Trolley Tours of Key West

201 Front St.; (855) 623-8289                                               

Historic Tours has been running sightseeing trolleys in Key West for more than 25 years. Hop on and off throughout the day at numerous attractions including the Hemingway House, Little White House, Shell Shop and Mallory Square.



The Oldest House Museum

322 Duval St.; (305) 294-9501                                               

The Oldest House in Key West features family portraits, original furnishings and other period pieces, ship models and documents that tell the story of old Key West. In the rear of the house is a spacious, peaceful garden where benches invite you to sit and reflect.


Red Barn Theatre

319 Duval St.; (305) 296-9911

The Red Barn Theatre has been producing plays and musicals in Key West for more than 35 years. This 88-seat theater is actually a converted carriage house built behind the Duval Street mansion in 1829.


Ripley’s Believe It or Not!

108 Duval St.; (305) 293-9939

Ripley’s contains more than 550 odd, bizarre and unusual exhibits housed in a historical building. Exhibits include taxidermy of two-headed animals, a shrunken torso, white buffalo and a landscape carving made of camel bone, among many others.


San Carlos Institute

516 Duval St.; (305) 294-3887

This historic landmark serves as a Cuban museum, library, art gallery and theater. Take a self-guided tour through exhibits such as The Life and Works of José Martí: 1853-1895, and the History of the San Carlos Institute.


Sloan’s Ghost Hunt

Tours start at Kelly’s Caribbean Bar & Grill, 301 Whitehead St.; (305) 395-1435

David Sloan is the author of the books Ghosts of Key West and Haunted Key West and is the haunted history columnist for the local newspaper. Sloan’s Ghost Hunt tour takes you through Old Town using “actual” ghost- hunting equipment.


The Southernmost Point

Corner of Whitehead and South streets

This colorful, anchored concrete buoy was erected in 1983 to commemorate Key West as the southernmost point of the continental United States. There is usually a line of people queuing to take their photo next to the buoy.


The Studios of Key West

533 Eaton St.; (305) 296-0458

The Studios of Key West is a local nonprofit dedicated to nurturing artists and the artistic process. This newly renovated building houses a gallery devoted to contemporary art, a theater, artists’ studios and classrooms.


Tennessee Williams Key West Exhibit

513 Truman Ave.; (305) 842-1666

Learn about Tennessee Williams’ literary accomplishments and life in Key West through this extensive collection of photographs, first-edition plays and books, rare newspaper and magazine articles, videos, a typewriter used by the author while writing in Key West and other artifacts on display.


Tennessee Williams Theatre

5901 College Road, Stock Island; (305) 296-1520 or (305) 295-7676 (tickets)

The Tennessee Williams Theatre presents national tours, concerts and local and national cabarets in the facility at Florida Keys Community College.


Tropic Cinema

416 Eaton St., Key West FL 33040; (305)433-3511

Tropic Cinema is a nonprofit movie theater that shows independent films and documentaries in addition to hosting a wide variety of community cultural events.


U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham Maritime Museum and National Historic Landmark

0 Southard St.; (305) 395-9554

With more than 50 years of service around the world, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Ingham offers a portrait of Coast Guard history from 1936 to 1988.


Waterfront Playhouse

310 Wall St.; (305) 294-5015

The nonprofit Waterfront Playhouse produces plays and musicals in its 150- seat theater, right next to Mallory Square. The building is actually a converted ice- house from the 1880s, and the original, sweeping stone walls still stand.


West Martello Tower

1100 Atlantic Blvd.; (305) 294-3210

The West Martello Tower is a former Civil War-era fortification that is now home to the Key West Garden Club and the Joe Allen Garden Center. Take a walk along the brick pathways to view its collection of native and exotic trees and plants.